Monday, January 27, 2014

New online series on Literary Criticism

I am launching a new online series on literary criticism, emphasizing prominent people as literary critics but also covering genres and thematic overviews.

  1. Henry Fielding. 
  2. Sir Walter Scott
  3. Ralph Waldo Emerson
  4. Gotthold Ephraim Lessing 
  5. Margaret Fuller 
  6. Frank Lentricchia 
  7. Hugh of St. Victor 
   8. Stanley Fish 

New installments will be posted once a week. 

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Romanticism Sessions at MLA

There will be FOUR fantastic panels sponsored or co-sponsored by the Division on the English Romantic Period at the upcoming MLA:  MARK YOUR CALENDARS and support romanticism!
As some of you may know, the MLA, in a burst of consolidating energy (as they saw it), floated the idea of "absorbing" our division either into an 18th C. or 19th C. division: which proposal we (the Divisional Committee) roundly resisted, apparently successfully thus far.  But it's all the more important for us to demonstrate what we needs must feel: the ongoing vitality, unpredictability, and generativity of "romanticism" in all its modalities: your colleagues hope to see you at the panels (esp the ones scheduled at awkward times, e.g. the first day of the convention) and also at the Cash Bar co-hosted with the Victorian Division: to "Nature"! "Life"! "Now"! "Meta-physics"! "Romanticism"!  

all best,
Maureen McLane
NYU, Chair of the MLA Division on the English Romantic Period

Thursday, 9 January12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Chicago D, Chicago Marriott
Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period
Presiding: Marjorie Levinson, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
1. "'Now with Treble Soft,'" Jonathan Culler, Cornell Univ.
2. "What's in a Name? Romanticism and Terror," David E. Simpson, Univ. of California, Davis
3. "Taunting with Gavroche: Activist Deployments of Poetry," Lyn Hejinian, Univ. of California, Berkeley
"In this session, we offer and invite discussion of that temporality – the present --which cannot be spoken, only enacted, and we consider “enactment” from the perspectives of politics and poetic form"
348. Nature: Meta-physics
Friday, 10 January3:30–4:45 p.m., Chicago C, Chicago Marriott
Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period
Presiding: Miranda Jane Burgess, Univ. of British Columbia
1. "String Theory and Sideways Growth: The Ecology of Romantic Poetics," Sean Dempsey, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville
2. "Miss Bates and the Nomadic Space of Emma," Yoon-Sun Lee, Wellesley Coll.
3. "Keats and the Country Green," Jonathan D. Mulrooney, Coll. of the Holy Cross

470. Nature

Saturday, 11 January8:30–9:45 a.m., Belmont, Chicago Marriott
Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period
Presiding: Miranda Jane Burgess, Univ. of British Columbia
1. "Now No More," Jacques Khalip, Brown Univ.
2. "Romantic Posthumanism: The Horror of Interspecies Community in Romantic England," Ted Geier, Univ. of California, Davis
3. "Goya's Scarcity," David L. Clark, McMaster Univ.

SPECIAL SESSION with the Late-18th C Division:

235. Life: Before and after 1800

Friday, 10 January10:15–11:30 a.m., Addison, Chicago Marriott
Program arranged by the Division on Late-Eighteenth-Century English Literature and the Division on the English Romantic Period
Presiding: Kevis Goodman, Univ. of California, Berkeley
Speakers: Amanda Jo Goldstein, Cornell Univ.; Heather Keenleyside, Univ. of Chicago; Catherine Packham, Univ. of Sussex; Andrew Piper, McGill Univ.
Session Description:
“Until the end of the eighteenth century . . . life does not exist: only living beings.” Our two divisions will revisit Foucault's still influential, periodizing thesis to question its validity in the light of recent work in the field and to think about what we do and do not share.